I am here.

NO IT’S NOT FITNESS. Just so you don’t close it right away. Anyway, moving forwards.

If you came to a 7 foot wall, what would your first thought be? A way around it I’m sure. But that isn’t an option. So option two, you look for a hand up. Nobody there. At least for now. So lets assume by some miracle, gruelling effort and personal strength you make it over the wall after god knows how long, what’s next? Most people say if you are good at something never do it for free. Well in some circumstance that would be true, but to me, if you are good at something, you have an obligation to help others with that experience. 

Getting over that wall is my experience, therefore I believe I have an obligation to others to help get them over it. 

NO IT IS NOT AN ACTUAL WALL.

We all face obstacles in life, some more extreme than others, higher walls as it were. So sometimes we need a leg up, or at least somebody behind us if we fall. 

I came across my own obstacles which I am unafraid to share, plenty of them in fact. If you are reading this you are either one of my subscribers (so much love to all of you) or you are one of my Facebook friends (assuming I had the balls to share this, so be kind). It’ll be very easy to laugh me off and frankly that is fine by me, I am not here for approval.

I am here as that leg up, or just a voice to guide or an ear to vent. Everything I went through I wished I had that hand up, it was one of two times in my life I prayed. Sadly I never got it. Without that I found my own way over the wall and I promised myself no matter what, if I came across the chance to help anyone else in any situation I would take it.

So whatever you are coming across, no matter how well you know me, all I am saying is: 

I am here. 

 

Aspire to Inspire. 

Travel Basics.

A list I found from when I did my first trip across the world. Simple, effective and damn right important. 
1. TORCH
Don’t be that person who returns to the room late at night and switches the main lights on; use a torch to make… your… way… quietly. I recommend the humble head torch. 
2. WET WIPES
They may seem a bit middle-aged woman with a handbag, but trust me — when you’re travelling, wet wipes are a gift. Use them to clean up scrapes and scratches, mop dust of your flip flops, wipe the sweat off your face (nice), freshen-up if you can’t have a shower (double nice)… the list goes on! 
3. DUCT TAPE
Use it to patch up any tears in your backpack! Secure your mosquito net with it! Repairing shoes – trust me I’ve seen it done. The point I’m trying to make is: duct tape is really very useful. Take some with you. 
4. CAMERA
Not only will your memories be preserved forever, you know you’re just dying to be that person on Facebook who makes everyone jealous with their travel pics. 
5. MONEY
Unfortunately, you can’t go travelling without having a bit of money. But instead of carrying loads of cash around with you, stick it on a Travel Cashcard. It works like a credit or debit card, but you preload your money on there, and there’ll be no getting into debt because you can only spend what you have. Genius! It can also be topped up by anyone (hi mum), anywhere, and you can also use it withdraw cash, so you don’t need to exchange currency.
6. CONDOMS
Young, free, single and — Anyway – promoting safe sex; so pack some quality condoms. You don’t want to be bringing any unwanted presents home with you, if you get my drift.
7. PASSPORT
You won’t get very far without your passport, but before you pack it, remember to check that it isn’t about to expire! Lots of countries — including backpacker havens Australia, Thailand and Malaysia — won’t let you in if your passport expires within 6 months of your arrival date. It’s also worth packing a photocopy of your passport, and other important docs. Email a copy of these to yourself so you always have them. Remember to check whether you need a visa to get into the country you’re travelling to.
8. DISCOUNT CARDS
Are you either a student, under 26 or a teacher? Lucky you! You’re eligible for a discount card that you can use all around the world on up to 40,000 discounts; including things like eating out, guidebooks, and getting around. It’s also worth grabbing a YHA card to save you money at all Youth Hostel Association hostels around the world.
9. DRUGS
No, not those kind of drugs though….– I’m talking about the medicinal kind! First up, we have paracetamol. Worth taking a stash with you, since your familiar brand is not always available abroad. Secondly, we have Tiger Balm. If you haven’t discovered this yet, now’s the time. It’s amazing for headaches and insect bites, and you can also slap some on your aching muscles. It’s widely available in Asia, so you can even pick some up on your travels. Thirdly, pack some diarrhoea medication. It’s likely that you will eat something… that, err… .
10. BABY POWDER
Baby powder… can be used from stopping your bag from rubbing, to soothing your skin, to keeping your hair clean, to stopping your shoes from rubbing… the list is endless! I don’t think I need to add anything to that.
11. SLEEPING BAG LINER
If you’re travelling on a budget, a sleeping bag liner is a must. It’s essentially a cosy thin sleeping bag, and it’ll protect you from any bed bugs that might be lurking in the slightly more questionable places you stay. Pop one in your backpack, and get a good night’s sleep instead of worrying about the state of the sheets. 
12. SIM CARD
Stay in contact with family and friends back home. Get aglobal SIM card and save big on international calls, texts and data use. Get coverage in 180 countries worldwide, free incoming calls in more than 70 countries and free Facebook notifications. Drop into store and grab one quick before you leave, or apply online. A global SIM is also a lifesaver (or at least a phone bill saver) when you want to contact friends you make on your travels about where to meet up with them later.
13. EAR PLUGS
Whoever invented ear plugs has definitely spent their fair share of time sleeping in dorm rooms. These nuggets of genius are pretty much essential if you want a good night’s sleep in a hostel. They’re also handy for sleeper trains and buses.
14. MOSQUITO REPELLENT AND MOSQUITO NET
No one likes to itch, and no one likes to be covered in bright red splotches. Even if you’re one of those really annoying people who never seems to get bitten (I hate you), it’s worth spraying on some mossie repellent and investing in a net, particularly in Malaria zones.
15. NOTEBOOK AND PENS
I guarantee that despite your good intentions to start a blog, by the time you get round to typing it up, you’ll have forgotten loads. Nothing beats lying on an isolated beach with a notebook in your hand, writing about your latest travel adventures and capturing how you’re feeling. It would be a shame if all those amazing things will be forgotten… and you can’t capture every experience in pictures or remember every detail forever. so I write them down!
16. TRAVEL INSURANCE
OK it’s boring, and yes, I sound like your mum, but it’s so, so important — not least because you can’t get it once you’ve left! Don’t let getting your iPod nicked or having to fork out for medical treatment ruin your trip. You can buy insurance from only 35p day – especially designed with the young and adventurous traveller in mind. Get covered for over 100 adventure sports and adrenalin activities free of charge.
17. IPOD/IPHONE
Or a similar smartphone with music-listening capabilities. Travelling without music on long bus journeys is no fun; plus, the songs you listen to will forever remind you of your travels. Plus, you can use your smartphone to access wifi. Google maps was invaluable whilst I was away. Before moving to a new town I would load the map area so when I arrived I could never get too lost! Especially useful when arriving somewhere late at night. Just remember to turn data roaming off, or risk being landed with a massive phone bill.
18. PADLOCKS
Take a couple of padlocks. They’ll keep your backpack secure, and you can also use them on lockers in some hostels.
19. TOILET ROLL
Stick some loo roll in your bag, particularly if you’re travelling around Latin America or Asia, where the public toilets may be notably void of hallowed roll. On a toilet-related note; start practising your crouching skills, as the public loos will probably be lacking in seats – squat toilets, anyone? You’ll soon get used to them.
20. SCARF
No, not the woolly winter kind; I’m talking about a nice big lightweight scarf – ladies call them pashminas. Gents, why not try a keffiyeh, or a less-politically-controversial-but-still-manly equivalent. Not only will a scarf keep you warm if the evenings get chilly, it can also double up as a beach blanket, and protect you against subzero air conditioning on a bus or train journey.
21. VISAS!
Make sure you’ve got your visas fixed up, or you’ll be waiting a long, long, long time at the border. If you have fewer than five days to go, no drama, that’s just about time to visit your local store and submit a fast-track visa service, for any entrance visa.
Aspire to Inspire.

Fat Loss 101

People have and will always still continue to use the wrong approach for fat loss.

A resistance approach will always be king but for those who enjoy banging their head against a brick wall and persist on using cardio for fat loss more often than not still use the wrong approach.

They insist on long, mind-numbing hours on a treadmill or bike. It is not hard to see why people take this approach – it’s what everyone else seems to be doing at the gym. It makes sense doesn’t it? if you want results then you have to put in the time doing something you dislike?

Doing hours upon hours of steady state cardio each week you will lose weight. Unfortunately it isn’t healthy weight. What you’ll end up losing is mostly water and muscle weight. I see it everyday, people gripping the shit out of the treadmill until they surround themselves in a pool of sweat. They jump straight onto the treadmill to see they have lost their bodies of water, this is great until they have a drink

By losing muscle, you will slow down your metabolism even more causing you to gain body fat….Have you ever lost weight at the gym doing this, stop due to boredom and wonder why you have put the weight back on and possibly more?

You will be thinking it’s working because the scale weight is going down. All the while, your trouser/dress size has barely moved. You’re negatively re-compositioning your body; trading muscle for fat.

When it comes to cardio for the purpose of fat loss, the most effective method is actually the least obvious – going on shorter, but higher intensity sprints is significantly better for fat loss than long, steady jogs.

This method of sprinting for fat loss is known as high intensity interval training, or HIIT. I have blogged on this topic before, look back for more information.

Aspire to inspire.

I’m trying to remember who I am.

I am not who I was. Nor am I yet who I will one day be. The ambitions I had yesterday have adapted and the dreams I’ll have tonight will set in tomorrow. The unachievable ideas once thought up have been humbly accomplished. Tomorrow hasn’t begun, yesterday is over and today is moving without control.

 

So where does that all leave me? 

I found myself waking up to this thought that I am a bit lost. I’ll admit it is somewhat frightening. let me explain. 

2 years ago (give or take), I wasn’t who I am now. I was lost, scared, depressed and without ambition. Over the following 2 years I grew exponentially in every way I could have hoped, so that version of me was lost, regardless of what was learnt from that stage. In that time i have set upon a new path and formed new dreams (as I continued to realise those i originally had).

 

So this has forced me to grow more, I NEED a goal, a dream to pursue. This doesn’t sound bad as such but it is remarkably stressful. By achieving my modest dreams, they have had to grow to more and more outrageous lengths. I now have goals of  own gym, to be qualified and educated, to be a councillor to help people and compete in all areas of fitness whilst producing my own apparel.. Oh and a decent wage. So the question is now who will I need to become?

How much of who I am today will be lost in the pursuit of new dreams – that is the thought I awoke to.

 

Aspire to Inspire – Whatever it takes.  

Bodybuilding Training Tips

It’s no secret that doing the same workouts with the same internal variables over and over again won’t lead to muscle growth. But you don’t need to completely abandon your routine every time you need a change.

1 DO YOUR MONDAY WORKOUT ON SUNDAY

I hate to ruin your love affair with football, but unless you enjoy standing in lines reminiscent of your childhood trip, Monday is absolutely the worst day to be in the gym—especially if you’re planning to train your chest. Ironically, if you were to hit that same gym a mere 24 hours earlier, you’d find it practically empty. I’ve come to find the most serious lifters at my gym are there on Sundays to skip the crowds. 

2 BUST OUT YOUR CARDIO BETWEEN SETS

We know you’re popular: You’ve got friends to text and conversations to catch up on with your crew at the gym. None of this changes the fact that you’ve still got a cardio session waiting for you at the end of your workout. Why not get your cardio done alongside your lifting.

Instead of sitting your butt on a bench between sets, you can speed things up, get your heart going, and burn calories at the same time. Active rest (doing a mild cardio activity between sets) will help you get a more productive workout and cut your time in the gym substantially. Try jumping rope, doing step-ups, or hitting box jumps for 45-60 seconds between weight-training sets. Just make sure you pace yourself.

 
3 ADD WEIGHT TO THE BAR WITH SMALLER PLATES

Working out with a partner has some huge advantages. But creating a partner-friendly workout means finding convenient ways to load and unload weights. Nothing feels more like wasted effort than continually having to make weight changes. By using the smaller plates you can more easily make weight changes, saving time and effort. Bonus: If you do dropsets, you can simply pull off the right amount of weight without having to take off one of the big wheels and replace it with a smaller plate.

4 TRAIN YOUR INTERNAL ALARM TO GO OFF AT 10 REPS

Too many lifters—at least the ones who never make any progress—come to the gym and choose weights they can lift for 10 reps, rest, and repeat. The problem with this approach is that the body has already grown accustomed to the load, and no further adaptation is taking place. You can literally train like this for years and never see progress.

Instead of hitting the usual 10 reps after your warm-up sets, choose challenging weights you can do for 6-8 reps—especially early in your workout, when your energy levels are high—and then employ sets of 8-10 later in your training session.

If you’re in fact going for 10 reps, you should barely be able to squeak out a 10th rep. When you can hit 10 reps without cheating or help, then it’s time to add a small plate to each side of the bar.

If you find that you’re taking every set to 10 reps, your internal alarm should go off. As soon as you hear yourself say the number 10, automatically add a plate to increase the overload. Don’t get lazy and work out on autopilot.

This tip applies mainly to multi-joint movements, especially for individuals looking to increase their size and strength.

 
5 INVEST IN STRAPS FOR EXTRA REPS

Often times when training your back, your grip will give out first. Never sacrifice your back for your hands. When your grip starts to fail, put on a pair of lifting straps and you’ll be able to get an extra rep or two on each set, which translates into more muscle growth. Don’t let your grip be your limiting factor on back day. If you want to work on grip or forearm development, throw those on to the end of your workouts.

When using straps, be sure to isolate your back and let the straps do their job. You don’t need to use an overly firm grip with straps. Just press lightly on them, allowing your forearms to relax a little to send the focus of the movement toward your back.

 
6 GET IN, GET IT DONE, GET OUT
 

IF YOUR WORKOUTS ARE TAKING TWO HOURS, WORK ON INCREASING THE INTENSITY (AND TEXTING LESS BETWEEN SETS) BY MAKING EACH SET HEAVIER AND HARDER.

You probably can’t sustain a high-intensity workout for long periods of time. You can, however, do a long workout with moderate intensity, but even that’s suboptimal for muscle gains. Powerlifters are known for longer workouts, but that’s typically due to more warm-ups and substantially longer rest periods between sets.

If your workouts are taking two hours, work on increasing the intensity (and texting less between sets) by making each set heavier and harder. Don’t just add more sets and exercises; that only serves to lengthen your workout.

Unless you’re a powerlifter (like myself), a faster pace does two things, it has been shown that shorter rest times and higher volume may improve your hormone activity, which means you’ll likely build size at a quicker rate. Second, it’s easier to stay focused for the duration of your session. Mental fatigue contributes to less-than-perfect focus and form, not to mention increased risk of injury.

Successful natural bodybuilders get in and out of the gym fast—in 60-75 minutes, tops. But what they sacrifice in duration, they more than make up for with intensity. Plus, you’ll save yourself an extra 45-60 minutes each day.

7 LEARN TO KEEP YOUR BACK ARCHED

Learning how to keep your lower back arched correctly when training is like learning how to ride a bike: It doesn’t come naturally at first, and you’re going to make mistakes along the way. But while falling off a bike may result in only a few scrapes, using bad form and rounding your back when training with heavy weights disrupts spinal alignment and can cause permanent damage. Disc herniation can happen when you don’t protect your spine during lifting.

You can save your spine and properly target your working muscles by learning how to hold the arch in your back. This is especially important for bent-over exercises like Romanian deadlifts, bent-over rows, and bent-over lateral raises.

By having normal curvature or even a slightly modified arch in your lower back you’ll also gain stability across the core. By breathing in on the negative and having your chest up, if you squeeze your abdominals in tight you’ll increase your intra-abdominal pressure and actually provide much greater strength across your core. As an added benefit, contracting your ab muscles will actually help build them to a degree.

To check your form, stand perpendicular to the mirror, bend over about 45 degrees, stick your arse out, keep your chest big and open and bend your knees slightly. Look sideways at the mirror and check your body position, ensuring you have a tight arch in your lower back—not a humpback that’s rounded forward. You must practice this until you get it right, and few beginners naturally get the hang of it.

8 DON’T DUPLICATE NEARLY IDENTICAL EXERCISES

You’ve probably heard that you want to hit a large muscle group with exercises from multiple angles over the course of your workout. Pay attention to bench angle and hand, foot, and body position so you’re not repeating very similar movements. Incline, decline, and flat-bench presses work the pecs from multiple angles, but there are only small differences between flat-bench barbell, flat-bench dumbbell, and flat-bench machine presses.

Angle training ensures that you hit every muscle fiber, especially in muscles that have multiple attachment points. Performing a similar exercise with a different piece of equipment may help improve stabilizer muscle contribution, but going from a machine to a barbell, or barbell to a dumbbell, still hits the muscles at almost the same angle. At the very least, if you’re going to do the same exercise at the same angle with a different piece of equipment, vary your grip or your stance [with leg exercises]. A varied grip changes the emphasis of the primary muscles and the activation pattern of the assisting muscles.

9 FINISH YOUR WORKOUTS WITH LOWER-BACK AND FOREARM EXERCISES

Want to know the best way to ensure you’re physically incapable of doing anything later in your workout? T your body’s weakest links and train them to failure. For most of you, that’s your grip and your lower back.

Once your lower back is fatigued, standing upright becomes nearly impossible, let alone maintaining good form with heavy weights. For safety’s sake, do lower-back exercises at the end of your training session, most likely on back day.

Likewise, blow your grip with forearm or grip training, and you can forget about holding on to anything afterward. A heavy set of bent-over barbell rows after forearm training? Not a chance. So save the forearm and grip training until the end of your workout, with no other body parts to follow. It’s also a good idea to skip training those body parts if they’ll be necessary for the next day’s workout.

10 DON’T LOOK FOR THE EASY WAY OUT

Everyone wants big muscles, but no one wants to lift heavy-ass weights. Eight-time Mr. Olympia Ronnie Coleman, and he was dead-on. If you’re looking for shortcuts or otherwise trying to make your workouts easier—avoiding free-weight squats, bench presses, and deadlifts, for example—I’m sorry to say that you’re taking the wrong approach.

Looking for the easy way out may also mean excessive cheating on your movements, such as bouncing the bar off your pecs when benching, or bringing your elbows forward when curling. Although there is a time and a place for cheating, relying on it takes stress and tension off the muscle, which is counter-productive in bodybuilding.

Find ways to increase the degree of difficulty and make movements harder, not easier. Add chains to your bench press, do negative reps, extend sets with dropsets, or decrease your rest intervals: whatever it takes to make a movement more difficult. When you substitute machine movements for free weights, do seated motions instead of standing, or otherwise look for ways to make your workout easier, you only short change yourself—and the results you see in the end.

 

Aspire to Inspire

9 Ideas to Improve Your Workouts

3 Ideas About Reps

1. Use Countdown Reps

I’m a huge fan of 5 x 5 workouts and this little change can be very valuable. I’ve always thought that the second to last set is the toughest mentally and this is a way to get around that problem. 5-4-3-2-1 … simple. 

2. The “And-One” Method

 “And” is the first rep and “one” is the second. A set of 10 looks like this:

You’ve done 10 reps, but you’ve only counted five. Ten reps can be a struggle for me by rep 8 or 9, but this method somehow tricks the mind. Much of training is a mind game, so accept it and play with it.

3. Embrace “Ish”

John Powell’s approach to the 5 x 5. Each year, he’d set a goal of doing a weight for 5 sets of 5. If he chose 365 as his target weight, he’d plop down on the bench once a week and test himself.

Workout One

He’d then add up the total reps of the workout (10 in this case). As the weeks and months progressed, he’d slowly work up into the teens, and then the low twenties. With a serious enough weight, it could take months to build up to the full 25 reps of a 5 x 5 workout. The upside of this workout may not be obvious, but it allows you to use heavy weights and slowly, steadily, build up the volume. Progress in life and the weightroom is as “ishy” as I can imagine.

3 Ideas About Workouts

1. Punch the Clock

Those are sessions where you just show up and do the work. If you had a plan, you followed it. If you had a preprinted workout, you finished it.

Like a craftsman, much of our training is going to be showing up and doing stuff. It’s also the kind of training that builds a reliable system over time. But there are times that you need to leave it all on the floor and sadly, in my second thought below, “leaving it all on the floor” can actually happen.

2. Perform Challenges

I like to call these workouts and short windows of training “challenges.” I also call these “Kill Yourself Workouts.” They’re great, but you can only do these for about three weeks before you die.

Most gyms that push “balls to the wall” training every session tend to have huge dropout rates, lots of physical therapy issues, and tend to close rather quickly. You certainly can do anything, but there’s wisdom in not doing everything all the time.

3. The Hangover Rule

I’d like to introduce you to “The Hangover Rule.” I’ve had conversations with people from all kinds of sports and I noticed a pattern – their lifetime best effort was often performed the morning after a series of bad decisions. 

Why? How? Don’t know and don’t ask. I’ve learned that extraordinary training sessions and days just pop out of nowhere and you have to enjoy your dance with these rare moments of life.

3 Ideas About Programming

1. Look for Gaps

In programming, I keep my eye on two basic concepts that open the way for a third. First, I’m all about looking for gaps in training. Gaps consist of anything you should be doing, but aren’t doing. Here’s my list of the fundamental human movements:

  • Push
  • Pull
  • Hinge
  • Squat
  • Loaded Carry
  • (Everything Else)

 

2. Meet the Standards

Next, logically, come the standards.

My standard for instance – 

Power Clean:
Deadlift:
Back Squat:
Front Squat:
Standing Press:
Power Clean & Jerk:
Bench Press:

The idea is to have attainable but high standards to keep in your mind every workout, these are not my max’s, but they are numbers I would be disappointed not to reach. 

3. Trust Your Intuition

You must trust yourself and train with intuition. It was once called “instinctive training,” but it’s simply this – when you’ve put the time, effort, and energy into your training, you can sometimes “get a hint” that you need to do X, Y, or Z.

Now that doesn’t mean every day is going to be arm day because the Force is telling you to work your biceps.

If you keep a running log of checking your gaps and trying to fulfill certain standards, you can allow yourself a lot more flexibility in your training because you can see over a week or month whether your “instinct” is right or wrong.

Your strengths won’t go anywhere. In fact, it tends to improve when the whole system is improved. So, when it comes to training on intuition, “Trust, but verify.”

Time Well Spent

I spend considerable time simply “thinking” about how to make my training  better. I urge you to do the same. It’s quality time that might be far more meaningful than much of what you do in the gym each day.

 

Aspire to Inspire. 

Living with Hypermobility Syndrome

Instead of having muscles that are too tight, people with hypermobility syndrome are often too flexible. They are able to extend their joints and flex their muscles beyond the normal range. Although this increased range of motion can serve as an advantage in activities such as gymnastics, dancing and swimming, hypermobility can cause numerous problems, particularly with joints. The best activities for hypermobile joints help to strengthen your muscles, while the worst activities increase their flexibility.

 

Hypermobility syndrome is characterized by excessive joint motion and joint instability. Normally, muscles and ligaments help ensure joint stability. When those tissues are too lax, their ability to stabilize joints is compromised. Loose muscles and ligaments allow for more wear and tear on the joints than normal. This can contribute to the development of osteoarthritis, the most prevalent form of arthritis.

If you suffer from hypermobility syndrome, engage in activities that strengthen your muscles. Stronger muscles are better equipped to protect the joints they surround. They provide more stability, thus decreasing not only joint wear and tear, but also your risk for joint displacement. Strengthening exercises are those that involve working with resistance, such as weight lifting, medicine balls and tension bands.

In general, you want to avoid stretching hyperflexible muscles any further. Instead, concentrate on isometric or concentric strengthening exercises. In isometric exercise, the joint doesn’t actually move, even though the muscles around it are contracting. Imagine pushing as hard as you can against a building, as if trying to move it – the muscles are working, but the joints don’t change position. Isometric exercises keep the joint stable and protected while still allowing the muscles to work properly and gain strength. With concentric exercises, muscles shorten as they contract, the way a biceps muscle behaves during a biceps curl.

The excessive range of motion present in hypermobility syndrome makes joints particularly vulnerable. Therefore, keeping muscles strong throughout their entire range of motion is especially important. Muscles tend to be strongest in their mid-range and weakest at either extreme of motion. That means a joint will be most vulnerable, or least protected, when it is at the end of its range of motion. Maintaining strength at range of motion extremes helps counteract that vulnerability in a joint that has too much range.

Prioritize strengthening the muscles surrounding the most susceptible joints: your shoulders, elbows, knees and ankles. Also focus on strengthening your core muscles in your lower back, abdomen, pelvis and hips, because they protect your spine. By stabilizing your entire body, a strong core also lessens the load on the most susceptible joints, reducing the chance for injury there as well.

Doctors do not recommend sustained muscle stretches for hypermobility syndrome, because muscles and ligaments are already too lax. For the same reason, eccentric exercises should be avoided, although it’s hard to avoid them completely. Eccentric contractions, commonly referred to as “getting the negative,” are the opposite of concentric contractions and occur when a muscle contracts while lengthening. Using the biceps curl again as an example, an eccentric contraction occurs when you lower the weight back down to starting position. During that phase, the biceps is getting longer as your arm extends down, even though the muscle is still contracting to control the downward movement. As the name implies, a lengthening contraction does lengthen the muscle, an undesirable action for muscles that are already too flexible.

 

Aspire to Inspire. 

Well… Crap

This is a vent session, sorry for the bore.

Just been to the doctors for a check in essentially. I’ve left being told I need to essentially stop powerlifting or i’ll permanently damage my tendons and mobility – Fuck hypermobility. Seriously fuck this. Having my own damn body let me down? Having all the god damn motivation, discipline and dedication mean absolutely nothing because I am not physically capable. 

Cannot explain how angry I am. 

So frankly, screw it, I’m not stopping. There is no chance in hell that I will allow myself to just give in. This may mean enduring some serious pains or injuries, so yes there will be that, but there is recovery. 

I will endure and I will continue to progress.

Aspire to Inspire.